About Anastasia Boden

Anastasia Boden is an attorney in PLF's Economic Liberty Project, where she challenges anti-competitive occupational licensing laws. She earned her law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, and her work has been featured in Forbes, the Washington Post, and Chicago Tribune.

Oregon Supreme Court cites broad statute in upholding egregious abuse of licensing power

We received an adverse ruling in our lawsuit on behalf of David Hansen, which challenged a ruling by the Oregon Board of Architects that David practiced unlicensed architecture when he created marketing drawings.  These drawings were not blueprints or plans; … Continue reading

The First Amendment protects speech that contradicts unions’ policy preferences

This week PLF filed its opening brief in the Ninth Circuit in Associated Builders and Contractors-California Cooperation Committee v. Becerra, which challenges a California law that threatens to cut funding to speech contrary to unions’ policy preferences. The lawsuit targets … Continue reading

California threatens to shut down book signings and therefore small booksellers

Today we filed this First Amendment lawsuit on behalf of beloved Bay Area bookstore Book Passage, and its co-owner, Bill Petrocelli. Book Passage is a hub of literary activity and free expression.  In addition to selling books, it hosts over 700 … Continue reading

Governor Justice signs bill repealing West Virginia Competitor’s Veto law

It’s a good day for economic liberty.  Governor Justice has signed SB 174—or as Arty Vogt calls it, “Stephanie’s law,”—which repeals West Virginia’s Competitor’s Veto statute. PLF represented Arty in a lawsuit challenging West Virginia’s licensing scheme for movers, which … Continue reading

West Virginia is more free today than it was yesterday

This morning the West Virginia legislature passed a bill repealing their Certificate of Need law, also known as a “Competitor’s Veto” law.  Formerly, anybody who wanted to start a moving business there essentially had to ask their competitors for permission … Continue reading

PLF hosts discussion on occupational licensing reform in California

On April 20th, PLF will host an event on occupational licensing reform in California.  Author Dick Carpenter will talk about his book Bottleneckers, followed by a panel discussion featuring state Senator John Moorlach, and me. Bottleneckers describes the phenomenon whereby … Continue reading

Op-ed on Nevada’s second bite at the free market apple

The Las Vegas Review-Journal has published my op-ed on AB 240, Nevada’s renewed attempt to get rid of its Competitor’s Veto law. As I write in the article: Nevada also passed a repeal bill last term, but Gov. Sandoval vetoed … Continue reading

Oregonian: Do you need a license to draw pretty pictures?

The Oregonian has published my op-ed on PLF client David Hansen, who was fined $30,000 for making marketing drawings without an architect’s license.  As I write in the op-ed: David’s story is just one example in a trend of licensing … Continue reading

Update: Nevada has another chance to do the right thing

Today I’ll be testifying to the Nevada Assembly Committee on Transportation in support of A.B. 228, which would repeal the state’s Competitor’s Veto law. Readers might be having deja vu.  That’s because last year, I testified on behalf of PLF … Continue reading

California can’t stifle open-shop speech just because it doesn’t like the content

Today we filed our notice of appeal to the Ninth Circuit on behalf of Associated Builders & Contractors of California Cooperation Committee (ABC-CCC).  ABC-CCC is an organization that advocates on behalf of the “open-shop” industry—that is, on behalf of entities … Continue reading