About Anastasia Boden

Anastasia Boden is a Staff Attorney in PLF's Economic Liberty Project. She earned a degree with Dean’s Honors in Global Studies with a minor in History from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and received her law degree from Georgetown University Law Center.

Op-ed on Nevada’s second bite at the free market apple

The Las Vegas Review-Journal has published my op-ed on AB 240, Nevada’s renewed attempt to get rid of its Competitor’s Veto law. As I write in the article: Nevada also passed a repeal bill last term, but Gov. Sandoval vetoed … Continue reading

Oregonian: Do you need a license to draw pretty pictures?

The Oregonian has published my op-ed on PLF client David Hansen, who was fined $30,000 for making marketing drawings without an architect’s license.  As I write in the op-ed: David’s story is just one example in a trend of licensing … Continue reading

Update: Nevada has another chance to do the right thing

Today I’ll be testifying to the Nevada Assembly Committee on Transportation in support of A.B. 228, which would repeal the state’s Competitor’s Veto law. Readers might be having deja vu.  That’s because last year, I testified on behalf of PLF … Continue reading

California can’t stifle open-shop speech just because it doesn’t like the content

Today we filed our notice of appeal to the Ninth Circuit on behalf of Associated Builders & Contractors of California Cooperation Committee (ABC-CCC).  ABC-CCC is an organization that advocates on behalf of the “open-shop” industry—that is, on behalf of entities … Continue reading

Chicago Tribune publishes PLF op-ed on the newest misguided licensing scheme

Occupational licensing has run amok.  Nearly a third of Americans need government permission in the form of a “license,” just to lawfully do their job.  These laws contribute to what Timothy Sandefur has called a “Permission Society,” and they make … Continue reading

PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their market share.  The result of such crony laws is that … Continue reading

Causation, and not deep pockets, should dictate liability

Today we filed this amicus brief asking the California Supreme Court to overturn the flawed decision in T.H. v. Novartis, which would essentially impose never-ending tort liability on brand-name drug manufacturers for injuries caused by their generic counterparts.  By adopting … Continue reading

Washington Post publishes op-ed on Arty Vogt’s fight for economic liberty

The Washington Post has published my op-ed regarding our newest Competitor’s Veto lawsuit on behalf of entrepreneur Arty Vogt. As you may remember, Arty owns a moving company based in Virginia, just miles from the West Virginia border. Arty started … Continue reading

A (mostly) victory when it comes to Alabama spying on your beer habits

Yesterday the Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board decided against adopting a creepy rule which would have required craft breweries to record the names, phone numbers, addresses, and birthdays of anyone who purchases craft beer for carryout.  As I detailed … Continue reading