About Anastasia Boden

Anastasia Boden is an attorney in PLF's Economic Liberty Project, where she challenges anti-competitive occupational licensing laws. She earned her law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, and her work has been featured in Forbes, the Washington Post, and Chicago Tribune.

PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their market share.  The result of such crony laws is that … Continue reading

Causation, and not deep pockets, should dictate liability

Today we filed this amicus brief asking the California Supreme Court to overturn the flawed decision in T.H. v. Novartis, which would essentially impose never-ending tort liability on brand-name drug manufacturers for injuries caused by their generic counterparts.  By adopting … Continue reading

Washington Post publishes op-ed on Arty Vogt’s fight for economic liberty

The Washington Post has published my op-ed regarding our newest Competitor’s Veto lawsuit on behalf of entrepreneur Arty Vogt. As you may remember, Arty owns a moving company based in Virginia, just miles from the West Virginia border. Arty started … Continue reading

A (mostly) victory when it comes to Alabama spying on your beer habits

Yesterday the Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board decided against adopting a creepy rule which would have required craft breweries to record the names, phone numbers, addresses, and birthdays of anyone who purchases craft beer for carryout.  As I detailed … Continue reading

Forbes publishes piece on (yet another) creepy, anti-competitive law

Forbes has published my piece on Alabama’s proposed rule allowing the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board to creep on craft beer consumers.  Although the Board says the rule is a way for it to enforce the state’s rigid controls on how … Continue reading

For entrepreneurs, parents, and property owners, every day is Constitution Day

The Washington Times and New Hampshire Union Leader have published my Constitution Day op-ed, which details why the Constitution is vital—not just today, but every day.  The Constitution is what makes PLF’s job possible, and allows us to fight back … Continue reading

Courts should care about your right to earn a living

Though the rights to free speech and bear arms get all the press, the right to earn a living might be the most fundamental right of all.  The Fourteenth Amendment protects that right—allowing all of us the opportunity to provide … Continue reading

AL wants craft brewers to record your personal information before selling you a beer

The alcohol industry is famously anti-competitive.  It has numerous regulations that make it difficult for new companies to start up, and that keep the big producers on top.  Readers may recall PLF’s challenge to a Florida law that outright banned … Continue reading

Courts shouldn’t throw out our claims before we have the chance to prove them

Over half of states have laws that require entrepreneurs to get permission from existing businesses to open up shop.  We call these laws “Competitor’s Veto” laws, and we’ve challenged them successfully in Oregon, Missouri, Kentucky, and Montana.  Now we’re challenging them in … Continue reading

States can’t evade the First Amendment by labeling speech “professional conduct”

Today we filed this brief asking a full panel of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear our case on behalf of Leslie Young. Leslie Young is an advertising broker.  She started her business—eList.me—to help people who want to … Continue reading