About Brian T. Hodges

Brian T. Hodges is a Principal Attorney and the Managing Attorney of PLF’s Northwest center. He is a strong proponent of individual and property rights and actively litigates in the areas of regulatory takings, due process, land use, growth management, privacy, and administrative law.

PLF asks the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that there is no “legislative exception” to the unconstitutional conditions doctrine

On Friday, PLF attorneys filed a petition for a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court in the case, 616 Croft Ave, LLC v. City of West Hollywood. The petition asks the Court to review a California Court of … Continue reading

PLF asks Louisiana Supreme Court to curtail eminent domain abuse

Eminent domain—the sovereign’s authority to take private property without the owner’s consent—is a terrible and awesome power, which is why the nation’s founders placed two key restrictions on its exercise: that government shall not take property unless it is for … Continue reading

Washington Supreme Court to consider the limits of the public trust doctrine

The Washington State Supreme Court is set to hear arguments next month in Chelan Basin Conservancy v. GBI Holding Co., which is a very important and far-reaching case concerning the public trust doctrine. Broadly stated, the public trust doctrine holds … Continue reading

PLF petition seeks review of West Hollywood’s extortionate “affordable-housing” scheme

Earlier today, PLF attorneys filed the reply brief in 616 Croft Ave, LLC v. City of West Hollywood. As you may recall, this case arose from the City’s demand that husband and wife entrepreneurs Shelah and Jonathan Lehrer-Graiwer pay a … Continue reading

Concentrated power imperils liberty

Last week’s decision in PHH Corp. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau brought into fine focus the fact that one of the greatest threats to individual liberty is the unchecked growth of the administrative state. Because the enactment and enforcement of … Continue reading

PLF argues that business losses are recoverable in eminent domain cases

One of the most basic protections that the U.S. Constitution provides for property owners is the guarantee that the government cannot take private property without paying just compensation. That mandate is intended not only to ensure that owners are made … Continue reading

Washington’s “relevant parcel” analysis is pure shenanigans

Takings law is famous for its thorny inquiries. One of the prickliest is the so-called “relevant parcel” determination. In every regulatory takings case, the court must begin by identifying the nature of the property at issue—i.e., the “relevant parcel.” It … Continue reading

U.S. Supreme Court set to conference on shoreline exaction scheme

Almost a century ago, Justice Holmes famously warned that “We are in danger of forgetting that a strong public desire to improve the public condition is not enough to warrant achieving the desire by a shorter cut than the constitutional … Continue reading

Washington state exaction scheme before the U.S. Supreme Court

San Juan County’s scheme to force shoreline property owners into dedicating water treatment buffers is now pending on a certiorari petition with the U.S. Supreme Court in the case, Common Sense Alliance v. San Juan County. As you may recall, … Continue reading