About Deborah J. LaFetra

Deborah LaFetra is a Principal Attorney in PLF's Individual Rights practice group. She directs PLF's Free Enterprise Project.

Liberating workers from compulsory unionism

The very powerful public employee unions in Illinois have long relied on their favored status to garnish wages of workers and “represent” them in politically-fraught negotiations over collective bargaining agreements with the state. The unions’ power is so great that … Continue reading

Supreme Court tacitly accepts class action lawyers’ ability to evade employment contracts (for now)

California’s Private Attorney General Act is a bounty hunter statute that deputizes employees as “representatives” to sue their employers for alleged Labor Code violations. These representative actions bear a close resemblance to a standard class action, with the exception that … Continue reading

Freedom of contract at stake in a Supreme Court trio

In January, the Supreme Court granted certiorari and consolidated three cases to decide whether the National Labor Relations Act, which protects workers’ rights to engage in “concerted activities” for their mutual benefit, trumps the Federal Arbitration Act’s protection of the … Continue reading

Ex-Bloomingdale’s employee prefers forum shopping

When the California Supreme Court invalidated yet another arbitration contract in yesterday’s McGill v. Citibank decision, I explained that a cert petition would almost certainly follow. PLF has supported many, many cert petitions challenging California’s anti-arbitration rules because we believe … Continue reading

California Supreme Court’s latest slippery evasion of federal arbitration law

Sharon McGill sued Citibank under California’s consumer protection laws for alleged unfair competition and false advertising in offering a credit insurance plan she purchased to protect her Citibank credit card account. McGill signed a contract that contained an arbitration provision … Continue reading

Supreme Court won’t consider exclusive representation laws . . . for now

The Supreme Court often prefers that issues “percolate” in the lower courts for some time so that Circuit court and state supreme court judges have an opportunity to address all facets and implications of the arguments prior to high court … Continue reading

NY Court of Appeals: No control = no tort liability

Last Thursday, the New York Court of Appeals unanimously relieved a drug-treatment halfway house of liability for a former resident’s subsequent assault on his mother’s boyfriend. The case, Oddo v. Queens Village Committee for Mental Health for Jamaica Community Adolescent … Continue reading