About Reed Hopper

Mr. Hopper is a principal attorney in PLF’s Environmental Law Practice Group. He oversees the foundation’s Endangered Species Act Program and PLF’s Clean Water Act Project.

PLF Supreme Court cases have changed administrative law forever

Readers of this blog are familiar with our unanimous victory in Sackett v. EPA in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled landowners had a right to immediate challenge of EPA compliance orders in federal court. Subsequent to Sackett, we won … Continue reading

Corps issues questionable guidance on Jurisdictional Determinations

When we won a unanimous decision in the U.S. Supreme Court in Army Corps v. Hawkes, earlier this year, some wondered how the Corps would respond. The concern was natural given the government’s argument in court that the issuance of … Continue reading

The politicization of the clean water rule

After a two year investigation, a House of Representatives oversight committee released a damning report today that documents blatant government abuse in the drafting and promulgation of the Corps and EPA’s rule defining “waters of the United States” that are … Continue reading

6th Circuit delays Clean Water Rule challenge

Our challenge to the Corps and EPA’s controversial rule redefining “waters of the United States” (WOTUS), subject to federal control under the Clean Water Act, is on hold in the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals.  We were initially scheduled to … Continue reading

Eleventh Circuit takes a pass on Clean Water Rule challenge

We have noted here and here that the question about which court has jurisdiction to hear the many challenges to the Clean Water Rule, that redefines “waters of the United States” subject to federal control under the Clean Water Act, … Continue reading

Gopher frog case gets a boost from the States

We have discussed here the “unprecedented and sweeping” decision of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in Markle v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in which a split three-judge panel held the Service could designate private property as “critical habitat” … Continue reading