Could Texas soon be back under federal Voting Rights Act supervision?

In October, federal judge Nelva Gonzalez Ramos of the Southern District of Texas issued a far-reaching opinion striking down Texas’ new Voter ID law on several grounds. She not only found that the law violated Section 2 of the Voting … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — December 12, 2014

Property Rights — California Coastal Commission The California Coastal Commission has never been happy with our 1987 victory in Nollan v. California Coastal Commission where the United States Supreme Court held that its practice of demanding exactions in exchange for … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — December 5, 2014

Property Rights — The Public Trust Doctrine like The Blob? PLF attorneys filed an amicus brief with the Oregon Court of Appeals in Kramer v. City of Lake Oswego—a case in which two public access activists argue that the “public … Continue reading

Make the Fair Housing Act fair: Remove disparate impact

On October 2, 2014, the United States Supreme Court granted review in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.  When it did, the Court made it clear that it only wants to resolve one … Continue reading

Elite universities sued over race-based admissions

Yesterday, Harvard University and the University of North Carolina were sued over their race-based admissions practices. The complaints (here and here) describe, in detail, the divisive use of race at both universities. … Continue reading

Fifth Circuit denies rehearing en banc in Fisher v. University of Texas

The case of Abigail Fisher may be on its way to the Supreme Court a second time.  The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals denied her petition for rehearing en banc. Judge Garza filed a short dissent reiterating the points he made in his … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — November 7, 2014

Property Rights — Coastal Land Rights Victory We received a mixed, but largely favorable opinion from the federal trial court in Sansotta v. Town of Nag’s Head. This is the case where the town refused to allow beachfront homeowners to … Continue reading

Democracy, distrust, and the Schuette dissent

Today is Election Day. As Justice Sotomayor noted in her dissent in Schuette v. BAMN, “we are fortunate to live in a democratic society. But without checks, democratically approved legislation can oppress minority groups. For that reason, our Constitution places limits on … Continue reading

Government plays all kinds of tricks

Halloween is the perfect time to highlight some of the ways overreaching government plays dirty tricks on unsuspecting Americans. In Pacific Legal Foundation’s portfolio of more than 120 cases, regulators can get quite creative — and destructive — in putting … Continue reading

There’s no such thing as “careful” discrimination

PLF friend Jennifer Gratz published an op-ed in the Washington Times today on the Administration’s desire to see racial preferences continue indefinitely.  Here’s a snippet: In today’s increasingly pluralistic society, race usually does not — and certainly should not — determine what … Continue reading