When may a Napa wine be labeled as a Napa wine?

The federal Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) regulates the labeling of wines sold in interstate commerce. If a winemaker wants to label their wine using an “appellation of origin” from a recognized viticultural area like Napa, then the … Continue reading

A legislative victory in Nashville Airbnb case

Last month, PLF filed an amicus brief supporting the Anderson family and their right to advertise and rent out their Nashville home via Airbnb. One of the issues addressed in the brief is Nashville’s ban on signs that advertise a … Continue reading

I dream of a federal government that doesn’t overreach

Most people associate Cape Canaveral with NASA and the Kennedy Space Center, but many licensed commercial fishermen and crabbers in Merritt Island rely on the waters of Florida’s “Space Coast” to earn a living and to support their way of life. … Continue reading

Dentist’s legal battle with Ohio will continue

Advertising one’s area of expertise is usually desirable for both the professional and the public. But if you’re a dentist in Ohio, regardless of whether you are completely qualified in a specialty area of dentistry, you might not be allowed … Continue reading

Pokemon and private property

A flood swamped a quiet Australian suburb recently: a deluge of Pokemon and their intrepid hunters. The neighborhood park had become known as a great spot to play Pokemon Go. Rare Pokemon liked to hang out there–especially at night. The park disintegrated into a trampled … Continue reading

Courts shouldn’t throw out our claims before we have the chance to prove them

Over half of states have laws that require entrepreneurs to get permission from existing businesses to open up shop.  We call these laws “Competitor’s Veto” laws, and we’ve challenged them successfully in Oregon, Missouri, Kentucky, and Montana.  Now we’re challenging them in … Continue reading

First Amendment success in California (and it didn’t even require a lawsuit)

All too often, cities fail to respect the First Amendment and pass unconstitutional laws that restrict people’s ability to advertise with signs. For recent examples, see here and here. But occasionally, cities can do the right thing. I’m happy to report that this … Continue reading

Oral argument in “Docs v. Glocks” case

Last month, an en banc Eleventh Circuit heard oral arguments in Wollschlaeger v. Governor of the State of Florida (popularly known as Docs v. Glocks). The case concerns whether a Florida law that prohibits doctors from asking their patients questions about … Continue reading

Nashville’s unconstitutional efforts to limit short-term rentals

With the rise of websites like Airbnb and VRBO, short-term rentals dramatically increase the opportunities for property-owners to supplement their income and retain flexibility with their homes. Unfortunately, last year, Nashville passed two ordinances that unconstitutionally regulate and restrict the ability … Continue reading

States can’t evade the First Amendment by labeling speech “professional conduct”

Today we filed this brief asking a full panel of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear our case on behalf of Leslie Young. Leslie Young is an advertising broker.  She started her business—eList.me—to help people who want to … Continue reading