Oregon Supreme Court cites broad statute in upholding egregious abuse of licensing power

We received an adverse ruling in our lawsuit on behalf of David Hansen, which challenged a ruling by the Oregon Board of Architects that David practiced unlicensed architecture when he created marketing drawings.  These drawings were not blueprints or plans; … Continue reading

Preliminary injunction sought against Wisconsin’s artisanal butter ban

This morning PLF filed a motion for preliminary injunction in our challenge to Wisconsin’s artisanal butter ban. It has been nearly four months since Wisconsin first told our client, Minerva Dairy, that its Amish-churned butter was not welcome in the state. … Continue reading

Yes, the Constitution even protects communists

Naively, I thought that was obvious. But apparently I was wrong. In California, government employees may be fired solely because they are a member of the Communist Party. What if they’re great at their job? Doesn’t matter. What if their … Continue reading

California threatens to shut down book signings and therefore small booksellers

Today we filed this First Amendment lawsuit on behalf of beloved Bay Area bookstore Book Passage, and its co-owner, Bill Petrocelli. Book Passage is a hub of literary activity and free expression.  In addition to selling books, it hosts over 700 … Continue reading

Governor Justice signs bill repealing West Virginia Competitor’s Veto law

It’s a good day for economic liberty.  Governor Justice has signed SB 174—or as Arty Vogt calls it, “Stephanie’s law,”—which repeals West Virginia’s Competitor’s Veto statute. PLF represented Arty in a lawsuit challenging West Virginia’s licensing scheme for movers, which … Continue reading

Minerva Dairy challenges Wisconsin’s anti-competitive artisanal butter ban

This morning, Minerva Dairy and its President, Adam Mueller, challenged a Wisconsin law that bans butter from being sold within Wisconsin if it hasn’t first been “graded.” Wisconsin’s law prevents butter makers outside of Wisconsin from selling their products in … Continue reading

South Carolina Supreme Court gets it right on economic protectionism

As pointed out by Eugene Volokh, the South Carolina Supreme Court recently considered a case in which the S.C. Department of Revenue defended a law on the sole basis of protecting one industry group (operators of small liquor stores) from competing … Continue reading

Weekly litigation report — April 8, 2017

Competitors’ Veto Law Repealed! Another “relevant parcel” case headed for the Supreme Court Cap and trade upheld by California court of appeal Just compensation means compensation that is just, not cheap Oral argument in Missouri anti-discrimination case California courts don’t … Continue reading

West Virginia is more free today than it was yesterday

This morning the West Virginia legislature passed a bill repealing their Certificate of Need law, also known as a “Competitor’s Veto” law.  Formerly, anybody who wanted to start a moving business there essentially had to ask their competitors for permission … Continue reading

PLF hosts discussion on occupational licensing reform in California

On April 20th, PLF will host an event on occupational licensing reform in California.  Author Dick Carpenter will talk about his book Bottleneckers, followed by a panel discussion featuring state Senator John Moorlach, and me. Bottleneckers describes the phenomenon whereby … Continue reading