“Docs v. Glocks” case not about guns but speech, PLF says

Last month, PLF filed a brief in Wollschlaeger v. Governor of the State of Florida. The case, also known as “Docs v. Glocks,” will be argued in June at the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Recently, I was interviewed for an … Continue reading

PLF challenges law that allows businesses to veto new competition

Most people see the United States as the Land of Opportunity, where the right to pursue the occupation of one’s choice and to earn a living for oneself and one’s family is simply a “given.”  Yet over half the states … Continue reading

Lemonade stand freedom coming to Louisiana

By now I’m sure you’ve heard a story about an overzealous health inspector or police officer ticketing a harmless child for having the nerve to operate a lemonade stand without a license or permit. Not even Jerry Seinfeld’s kids are … Continue reading

Supplemental briefing in challenge to Union Access Rule

In Cedar Point Nursery v. Gould, PLF attorneys challenge the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board’s Union Access Rule.  Pursuant to this rule, unions can gain access to employers’ property, without their consent, to proselytize employees about the “benefits” of union … Continue reading

D.C. Circuit blows whistle on Amtrak

Late last week, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the federal Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIIA). Among other things, PRIIA authorizes Amtrak to regulate its competitors. Now, you may be wondering how Amtrak can … Continue reading

New data on occupational licensing confirms existence of rent-seeking incentives

The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics recently released new data that shows workers with an occupational license or certification tend to earn higher wages than those without a license or certification. That shouldn’t be all that surprising since one of the … Continue reading

The crime of charging customers too little in Florida

Do we really need laws that prohibit entrepreneurs from charging consumers too little? PLF’s economic liberty project challenges so-called “minimum price” laws that do just that. These laws are rich examples of cronyism and, unfortunately, a Florida state appellate court … Continue reading

Do doctors give up their First Amendment rights when they speak with patients?

The answer to that question should be “no.” Unfortunately, something called the “professional speech doctrine” practically makes the answer, “yes.” That’s why today, as part of our ongoing effort to support free speech, PLF filed a brief in Wollschlaeger v. … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — April 15, 2016

It’s been a very busy week at Pacific Legal Foundation.  Here are the highlights. Protecting property rights in the Supreme Court  A week after oral argument before the Supreme Court in Hawkes, PLF attorneys are already preparing their next case at … Continue reading

Baseball, arbitration clauses, and publicly funded stadiums

Unless you live in Adelanto, California or closely follow Minor League Baseball, you’ve probably missed out on the brouhaha between the city of Adelanto and the owners of the High Desert Mavericks baseball team. The trouble centers on the 2012 … Continue reading