President’s weekly report — May 1, 2015

On the cusp of victory in Florida — In large part due to the publicity from our “growler” case, Crafted Keg v. Lawson, the Florida legislature has repealed the ban on “growlers,” the 64 ounce containers used for bringing craft … Continue reading

Will the Supreme Court’s second Horne decision undermine Williamson County ripeness?

One issue that has received little attention following the oral argument in Horne v. United States Department of Agriculture is the question of what the Hornes’ remedy should be if they prevail. Readers will recall that the Supreme Court last … Continue reading

Supreme Court grants important “standing” case

Thomas Robins, an unemployed man, sued Spokeo Inc., which runs a website that collects and publishes consumer “credit estimates,” for willful violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), because it published false information, such as Robins was married, had … Continue reading

Montana takes a step toward economic liberty

Thanks to PLF’s lawsuit, yesterday the Montana legislature gave final approval to a bill that would eliminate the state’s Competitor’s Veto law for taxi companies. Under current law, existing transportation businesses are allowed to essentially veto any new competition from people who want to … Continue reading

Everybody wins with at-will employment

In the U.S.A. of old, your boss could fire you if he didn’t like the color of your socks, the smell of your lunch, or the pitch of your sneeze. And you could get up and walk whenever it suited you. … Continue reading

Supreme Court hears argument in raisin takings case

The Supreme Court yesterday heard oral argument in the “raisin takings case,” Horne v. United States Department of Agriculture. As we have previously explained, the Department of Agriculture brought an enforcement action against California raisin farmers Marvin and Laura Horne … Continue reading

The end of innocents

An 11-year old girl saved a woodpecker from a cat and nursed it back to health. A father and son searched for arrowheads while camping. A middle schooler ate some french fries on the subway. A snowmobiler got lost for two … Continue reading

How Anne Brontë violated Nevada law by speaking without permission

Last week, we filed the final papers asking a federal judge in Las Vegas to stop the state from enforcing its “private investigator” licensing law—that’s the law that says that if you “furnish…information” about a “person,” and get paid for … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — April 10, 2015

Wetlands — Major victory in the 8th Circuit The 8th Circuit handed us this major victory today in Hawkes v. United States.  The decision is a wonder to read because the court “got it.”  It understood that requiring a landowner to … Continue reading

Montana tries to get our Competitor’s Veto lawsuit kicked out of court

Today we asked a Federal court not to throw out our case challenging Montana’s Competitor’s Veto law.  Our client, Tracie Pabst, has owned shuttle companies in Montana, North Dakota, New Mexico, and Texas, and has provided service to over 170,000 … Continue reading