The fight against overcriminalization continues

Last week, PLF’s motion to intervene was granted in a case threatening to radically expand criminal liability under the Endangered Species Act. As you may recall, we represent several southwestern agricultural organizations who, like pretty much everyone else, face the prospect of imprisonment … Continue reading

Weekly litigation report — December 2, 2016

Right to say you are who you are We filed this complaint on behalf of Peggy Fontenot against the State of Oklahoma. The rub of Fontenot v. Pruitt is that Peggy Fontenot, who is a member of the Patawomeck Indian … Continue reading

California’s high court will review pension “spiking” case

Californians are accustomed to controversy when it comes to public employee pensions.  Although state and local governments across the country were left without adequate funding of pension obligations following the Great Recession of 2008-2009, California’s shortfall–estimated to be around $475 billion–was the … Continue reading

PLF Supreme Court cases have changed administrative law forever

Readers of this blog are familiar with our unanimous victory in Sackett v. EPA in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled landowners had a right to immediate challenge of EPA compliance orders in federal court. Subsequent to Sackett, we won … Continue reading

Still presumed guilty after exoneration

Calvin, from Calvin and Hobbes, wrote a letter to Santa one year: “Dear Santa, this year, please bear in mind that I should be presumed innocent until proven guilty. Also, I would encourage you to interpret ‘reasonable doubt’ as broadly … Continue reading

Weekly litigation report — November 19, 2016

Special taxes Endangered species — otters and urchins Guilty until proven innocent Separation of powers  Special taxes We filed our petition for review in Building Industry Association of the Bay Area v. City of San Ramon. This is the case … Continue reading

New Jersey places a bet on the Constitution

States are not puppets of the federal government, to be manipulated to accomplish whatever policy the federal government might prefer. If they were, both individual liberty and political accountability would be compromised. That’s why our Constitution forbids the feds from … Continue reading

Friends of the First Amendment file friend-of-the-court briefs

Financial regulators targeted Bob Bennie after he made unsavory comments about President Obama. Although Bennie spoke as a tea party activist, the regulators pressured Bennie’s employer to levy financial sanctions on him for sharing his political views. In a Supreme Court petition, PLF explained … Continue reading