President’s weekly report — July 24, 2015

A complaint that a four-year old could file? We filed this complaint in Oakland’s mandatory art fee case, Building Industry Association of the Bay Area v. City of Oakland.  The premise is simple — the City wants to be more … Continue reading

The government can’t call speech “conduct,” then require a license for it

If the First Amendment means anything, it means the right to speak freely without asking for permission first. Yet in Nebraska, you have to get a government license before advertising.  PLF client Leslie Young helps people to sell their homes … Continue reading

PLF sues to stop unconstitutional public art fee on new homes

Today’s money-no-object urban planning elite have a long list of things they think no modern city should be without, but many have no money to buy the stuff on their list. And, city residents tend not to support tax increases to pay for … Continue reading

Supreme Court orders three U.S. Courts of Appeals to reconsider cases upholding restrictions on speech

On Monday, the Supreme Court ordered three federal appellate courts to reconsider their decisions upholding sign restrictions in light of its recent decision in Reed v. Town of Gilbert. The Court emphasized in Reed that government regulation of speech is … Continue reading

Supreme Court to review public employee unions’ ability to garnish wages

The California Teachers Association—one of the most politically powerful groups in the state—may have to start funding its political campaigns with the money of only those teachers who actually support its goals.  Unlike other groups that seek donations from like-minded … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — June 19, 2015

Bad news on property rights from the California Supreme Court To celebrate the Magna Carta’s 800th birthday, the California Supreme Court issued this unanimous and depressing opinion on the state of property rights in California.  California Building Industry Association v. … Continue reading