President’s weekly report, April 29, 2016

Seattle trashed!  We had  this resounding trial court victory in Bonesteel v. City of Seattle, our challenge to Seattle’s trash-snooping law. In a city where political correctness trumps individual rights, the city passed an ordinance that not only requires Seattlelites … Continue reading

Do doctors give up their First Amendment rights when they speak with patients?

The answer to that question should be “no.” Unfortunately, something called the “professional speech doctrine” practically makes the answer, “yes.” That’s why today, as part of our ongoing effort to support free speech, PLF filed a brief in Wollschlaeger v. … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — April 1, 2016

Supreme Court member apologizes  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg today issued an apology today on behalf of all Justices, living and dead, who ever espoused the notion of a “living constitution.” Saying that she was visited by the ghost of her … Continue reading

Teachers’ constitutional rights: out with a whimper

I wrote about today’s Supreme Court affirmance-by-tie-vote in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association for Forbes.com.  The bottom line is that today’s decision is a profound disappointment to non-union public employees who were this close to prevailing over the unions’ ability … Continue reading

Florida music therapy bills die by inaction

Future music therapists in Florida–and their clients–can breathe a sigh of relief for one more year. Last Friday, March 11, the 2016 Florida legislative session ended before two bills that would have imposed onerous new regulations on the music therapy … Continue reading

Does the First Amendment protect website names?

Yesterday, the D.C. Circuit heard oral argument in Pursuing America’s Greatness v. FEC, a case that asks whether government can ban political action committees (PACs) from including the name of their favorite candidate in the title of a social media … Continue reading

The Slants win First Amendment challenge

The Slants, a rock band out of Portland, was told it could not trademark its band name because it was “disparaging.” The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board held that the name “The Slants” was derogatory towards Asians, and would not give trademark … Continue reading

Free speech prevails in Fourth Circuit do-over

After nearly four years of litigation, property owners’ First Amendment rights were finally vindicated by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in Central Radio Company v. City of Norfolk.  The court ruled that the City of Norfolk unconstitutionally … Continue reading

School choice, union power, and Obamacare

I will be on the air for another round of radio interviews this week. On Thursday morning, I’ll be talking about the Montana case and our Obamacare challenge with Pastor Greg Young. You can listen live here at 8:00 a.m. PST tomorrow morning, and … Continue reading

Scrap tires and school choice

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a religious liberty case that may bear on the success of school choice across the country. The case doesn’t directly involve school choice. It’s about scrap tires and playgrounds. But its outcome may determine the extent to … Continue reading