PLF argues in Oregon Supreme Court that laws should benefit the public, not cronies

Though occupational licensing laws are often justified in terms of health or safety, studies show that licensing regimes are more often bare attempts by entrenched business interests to protect their market share.  The result of such crony laws is that … Continue reading

Briefing update in Fairfax Memo Challenge

In National Federation of Independent Business v. Dougherty, we challenge the so-called Fairfax Memo, a substantial pro-union re-write of federal law governing workplace safety inspections. Last month, the feds moved to dismiss our challenge on procedural and substantive grounds. Yesterday, … Continue reading

The fight against overcriminalization continues

Last week, PLF’s motion to intervene was granted in a case threatening to radically expand criminal liability under the Endangered Species Act. As you may recall, we represent several southwestern agricultural organizations who, like pretty much everyone else, face the prospect of imprisonment … Continue reading

PLF Supreme Court cases have changed administrative law forever

Readers of this blog are familiar with our unanimous victory in Sackett v. EPA in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled landowners had a right to immediate challenge of EPA compliance orders in federal court. Subsequent to Sackett, we won … Continue reading

Sacramento city councilman reminded that the Constitution protects freedom of association

There was a small dust-up in the Sacramento press this week. It seems that Sacramento City Councilman Jay Schenirer has grown weary of a watchdog organization (Eye on Sacramento) that routinely challenges proposed ordinances and policies, and generally serves as … Continue reading

New Jersey places a bet on the Constitution

States are not puppets of the federal government, to be manipulated to accomplish whatever policy the federal government might prefer. If they were, both individual liberty and political accountability would be compromised. That’s why our Constitution forbids the feds from … Continue reading

While Fish and Wildlife scoffs at the law, otters scarf urchins

“Shall implement.” To most of us, this is perfectly straightforward, mandatory language. But to overreaching bureaucrats at the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, “shall implement” is merely a suggestion that the Service can follow at its leisure. In a … Continue reading

Washington Post publishes op-ed on Arty Vogt’s fight for economic liberty

The Washington Post has published my op-ed regarding our newest Competitor’s Veto lawsuit on behalf of entrepreneur Arty Vogt. As you may remember, Arty owns a moving company based in Virginia, just miles from the West Virginia border. Arty started … Continue reading