Should government tell you whom you can invite into your home?

Businesses would often prefer to shut out new innovators through regulation than compete with them. For example, taxi companies across the globe clamor for government to regulate the ride-sharing services of Uber and Lyft. These anti-competitive urges hurt economic growth and constrict … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — January 16, 2015

The Raisins are Dancing Again — cert grant The Supreme Court granted cert in Horne v. United States, making this the second trip to the Court for the dancing raisins.  Under a depression-era statute, raisin growers must give a substantial … Continue reading

The Interview shows why courts should fix the commercial speech doctrine

The Interview, a ridiculous movie about a fictional plot to assassinate the leader of North Korea, made millions this weekend after Sony Pictures decided to release it to those theaters and online stores willing to offer it. Sony’s decision came … Continue reading

If a tree falls in the forest, don’t take a selfie with it

Last month, the Forest Service proposed a regulation that would require permits costing as much as $1500 to take photographs or film on Forest Service land. The public response has been overwhelmingly negative [I tried but couldn’t make the sentence … Continue reading

Supreme Court denies cert in Minority TV free speech case

Today the Supreme Court denied cert in a First Amendment challenge to the FCC’s ban on certain types of paid advertising on public television stations. The ban prohibits commercials for for-profit businesses and politicians, but allows the stations to broadcast … Continue reading

PLF asks US Supreme Court to hear broadcasters out

For years, FCC has prohibited public broadcasters from showing paid advertisements by for-profit entities or political candidates.  So when Minority TV—a non-profit channel out of San Francisco—aired advertisements for Korean Air, Gingko Biloba Tea, and the like, FCC scrambled to … Continue reading

A defeat for free speech in California

In Beeman v. TDI Managed Care Services, the Ninth Circuit certified to the California Supreme Court the question of whether a statute requiring prescription drug claims processors to compile and summarize information on pharmacy fees for the purpose of distributing … Continue reading

I left my speech rights when I entered San Francisco

San Francisco city attorney Dennis Herrera has decided that Monster energy drinks are bad for you.  He’s also decided that Monster has to broadcast that message to its consumers. Mere months after ending its battle with cell phone purveyors, the … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — May 3, 2013

Environment — Endangered Species – Wolverine We filed our comments on the listing of the Wolverine as a “distinct population segment” of a subspecies.  The problem here is that the Endangered Species Act does not countenance the listing of such … Continue reading