NRO piece on PLF suit challenging Oakland’s public art exaction

Earlier this week, National Review Online ran my piece on PLF’s lawsuit against the City of Oakland. The lawsuit challenges an illegal ordinance requiring builders of residential and commercial projects in the City to either produce public art displays on … Continue reading

PLF attorneys discuss the California Raisin case in new article

Earlier this week, PLF attorneys Brian Hodges and Christopher Kieser published a professional commentary in Jurist, discussing the Supreme Court’s decision in the raisin case, Horne v. Department of Agriculture. In it, they argue that Horne provides more evidence that the … Continue reading

L.A. Daily Journal runs PLF Op-Ed on the Horne Decision

Today, the L.A. Daily Journal ran an op-ed written by PLF attorneys Brian T. Hodges and Christopher Kieser on the Supreme Court’s takings decision in the raisin case, Horne v. Department of Agriculture. The article can be read here. … Continue reading

There are many ways to protect endangered species

If species aren’t protected under the Endangered Species Act’s burdensome approach, they’ll receive no protection at all. This is an all too common refrain. But it’s a false choice. There are many ways to try to conserve and recover species. … Continue reading

President’s weekly report — June 5, 2015

 Lawsuit abuse — Filing without injury PLF filed this letter brief asking the California Supreme Court to review of Animal Legal Defense Fund v. LT Napa Partners—which PLF asked the Supreme Court to overturn an Unfair Competition Law (UCL) case that threatens … Continue reading

Federal Circuit: Residual value does not defeat a takings claim

Monday, the Federal Circuit issued a very good decision for property rights in Lost Tree Village Corp. v. United States. In this case, Lost Tree Village Corp. (Lost Tree) wanted to build a residential development on about five acres of … Continue reading

It’s good to have friends

Many friend-of-the-court briefs have been filed supporting People for the Ethical Treatment of Property Owners‘ challenge to the federal government’s unconstitutional Utah prairie dog regulation. These briefs are a reminder of how important the issue is and how unnecessary the … Continue reading

Is the Constitution a paradox?

In defending the constitutionality of the Utah prairie dog regulation, the government makes a paradoxical claim. Conceding that federal intrusions into areas of traditional state authority are unconstitutional, the government nonetheless argues that the Necessary and Proper Clause allows the … Continue reading